Archive for April, 2009

How to grow your graphics card effectiveness

Friday, April 17th, 2009

Water cooling, liquid nitrogen, and dry ice  - which gets the most of your  ATI Radeon HD 4890 graphics card? Learn it  from Zac O’Vadka today’s post

E-Discovery

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

If you have no idea what E-Discovery is, read Crossing the E-Discovery Border: IT and Legal. But if you do, I’d recommend attending this webinar anyway :)

Password cracking with Microsoft cofee

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

No, it’s no a typo :). COFEE means Computer Online Forensic Evidence Extractor, actually. Never heard about it? Then read Microsoft supplies Interpol with DIY forensics tool. Just don’t ask where to get it. We have not seen it either.

NEW: Rainbow Tables for password-protected Excel spreadsheets

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

And now…. we have Rainbow Tables for Microsoft Excel docs with 40-bit encryption. So, it became possible to reach near-instant recovery of 97% of spreadsheets created in MS Excel 97-2003. Unfortunately, due to specificity of Excel spreadsheets format it’s unreal to get 100%-recovery, still, you can use brute force to cover the rest 3%.  

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Attacking…

Result!

Electronic records security and encryption

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

Sad information: Hackers grab more than 285M records in 2008. Just curious, how about Sarbanes-Oxley Act, does it really work? :)

Microsoft Office 14

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

According to CNET News, Office 14 technical preview will be available in Q3, and release version in the first half of 2010; Office 2010 will come in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

If password encryption will be improved there — of course, we’ll update Office Password Recovery accordingly. Though it is already good enough in Office 2007 — even with GPU acceleration, the password recovery speed is only thousands passwords per second (see some benchmarks at Distributed Password Recovery page), so even relatively short passwords are secure enough.

New ATI Radeon card

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

The only our product that works with ATI cards (right now) is Wireless Security Auditor, but interesting news anyway: ATI Radeon HD 4770 Info Leaked. I’ll second the editor’s opinion that it will make a good competition to NVIDIA’a 9800GT (of course, supported by EWSA, too).

Even more news from AMD/ATI: AMD Athlon X2 7850 & Phenom II X4 955 are coming. Though according to our tests (e.g. with Advanced Office Password Breaker that supoorts up to 32 processors/cores; btw, it has been updated today), multi-core AMD chips are still slower than Intel ones.

Smart Password Mutations Explained

Wednesday, April 15th, 2009

Strong passwords are mutated passwords. Everyone who publishes recommendations on creating secure password says that you have to use both upper- and lower-case letters and inject some tricky special characters. Such recommendations may result in p@$$words and pAsswOrds, and p_a_s_s_w_o_r_d_s. The fact is that modern password recovery software uses dictionary attack to get one’s password back. Dictionary attack means searching lists of dictionary words and common phrases that can be found on the Internet or delivered with the software. It is easy to grab that dictionary words and word phrases make bad passwords, but one has to understand that adding special characters to these words and phrases does’t do them any good. Such password can be easily cracked when smart mutations option is on. 

We give you a tip on word mutations implemented by modern password cracking tools, so that you can create really strong passwords for your files and accounts.

Great hot water supply

Wednesday, April 15th, 2009

Google made a video tour inside their premises. Looks like an amazing wire-n-hardware gathering:

Oh, I wish we could rent this mass of metal for password cracking purposes! In that case, however, water cooling system would not be enough to chill all our graphic cards. Better to think of a way for heat-utilization, like channeling hot water to the nearest residential neighbourhood and  “use it as heating source for buildings in the area” as suggested by Anonymous in Seth H. Weintraub’s blog, or at least open Russian bath near it :).