Archive for the ‘Hardware’ Category

Canon cannot or mustn’t provide image validation feature?

Tuesday, November 30th, 2010

A true security system cannot be so fragile: Canon Original Data Security broken…

Find 3 differences from original Now if your partner gets a compromising anonymous image where you are enjoying yourself with nice blond with blue eyes or charming young man, don’t panic and don’t get upset, you can easily prove it is just a fake (even if it’s not ;) ).  Seriously, how can we trust photographic evidence in the era of Photoshop and other designer tools? The genuineness of a digital image can only be proven by special digital tools…like OSK-E3?

Unfortunately or maybe fortunately, it turned out that OSK-E3 (Canon Original Data Security Kit) cannot guarantee image authenticity, because now it can recognize even fake images as true and genuine. However, the problem is not in OSK-E3, it is in Canon Original Data Security system implemented in most modern Canon DSLR (Digital Single-Lens Reflex) cameras.

Now it’s possible (well, Dmitry did it recently and who knows if somebody could do it earlier ;) ) to dump camera’s memory, extract secret keys from the camera, and calculate ODD (= Original Decision Data) which answer for any changes done to the image. And thus name the modified image as original one.

What Canon can do? It seems like Canon can nothing do with their models right now, because the fundamental problem lies not in the software. Changing the software could possibly solve the question, until someone again finds its vulnerability. But adding cryptoprocessors that won’t expose the secret key and thus will prevent from any penetrations from outside would close the loophole.

Have a look at some of our fake images that pass verification test by OSK-E3: http://www.elcomsoft.com/canon.html

So, can you now trust Canon’s OSK decision if an image is original or not?

iPhone 4 Performance

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

Finally, we’ve got our first iPhone 4 in office. And what was the first thing we did with it? Yes, test its performance to complete table in my previous post.

This brand-new iPhone 4 is capable of doing 1.4 millions MD5 iterations per second, about 35% more than iPhone 3GS.

I haven’t found any information on iPhone 4CPU clock frequency, but if we assume that it uses same chip as iPad (which seems to be the case), then exhibited performance corresponds to roughly 775 MHz.

Measuring iPhone Performance

Thursday, August 5th, 2010

I’ve had plans to create some kind of performance measurement app for iPhone/iPod/iPad for quite a bit time of already, and after reading recent reports that iOS 4 is very slow on iPhone 3G I thought that time had finally come.

So I’ve quickly coded an app which computed performance in MD5 hash computations per second, and here are the results:

Device CPU Frequency Thousands MD5 per second
iPhone 3G 412 MHz 350
iPhone 3GS 600 MHz

1050

iPad 1 GHz 1800

The performance scales almost linearly (with respect to CPU frequency) for iPhone 3GS and iPad.

For iPhone 3G this is, however, not the case. Although CPU clock is only 1.5 times slower when compared to iPhone 3GS, overall performance is three times slower.

Puzzled, I did some research and found out that iPhone 3G and iPhone 3GS are using very different CPU cores indeed (link). The key difference is that iPhone 3GS uses dual-issue superscalar CPU which allows executing two instruction per clock. iPhone 3G utilized single-issue scalar core, and is thus limited to executing single instruction per clock. This perfectly explains missing factor of two in performance vs. clock rate difference between iPhone 3G and 3GS.

ATI is at it. Again.

Wednesday, May 12th, 2010

Two months ago I wrote a blog post "ATI and NVIDIA: Making Friends out of Enemies" where (among other things) I wrote:

Developing software for ATI cards is (okay — was) a nightmare. In 2009 ATI quietly introduced two changes in their drivers which made previously perfectly functional and compatible applications to crash (if you are curious: with Catalyst 9.2 or 9.3 they’ve changed names of supporting DLLs bundled with drivers; with Catalyst 9.9 or 9.10 they’ve probably changed format of underlying binary so that anything compiled and linked in with earlier versions caused a driver to crash).

Well, with the release of Catalyst 10.4 drivers ATI is again at it. This time problem only affects users who have display adapters from different vendors in their computer. Applications utilizing ATI Stream will work on such configurations just fine with Catalyst 10.3, but once you upgrade to 10.4, applications will crash with faulting module being aticaldd.dll, a part of ATI Display driver. Kinda embarrassing, I would say. Regression testing is really something one with millions of users should consider.

Users of our software relying on ATI hardware accelerations (as well as any other ATI Stream enabled applications) should not update to 10.4 if ATI Readeon is not the only card in their computer.

ATI and NVIDIA: Making Friends out of Enemies

Friday, March 12th, 2010

There had been a long standing competition between NVIDIA and ATI which has lasted for years now. And there is no winner so far — just like with Windows vs. Linux or PC vs. Mac debate there are ones who prefer the former and others who prefer the latter. Kind of «religious» issue.

(more…)

New password-cracking hardware

Friday, February 19th, 2010

Some time ago we wrote about the smallest password cracking device. Not suitable for you? No problem, here is another one: not as small, but definitely more powerfull: Audi. Yes, it's a car. No, we're not kidding. Just read NVIDIA and Audi Marry Silicon Valley Technology with German Engineering press release from NVIDIA. Or if you need more information, The New MMI Generation from Audi might be also helpful. In brief: Audi A8 luxury sedan is equipped with an entertainment system that uses two GPUs from NVIDIA. We have no idea what are these chips (may be Fermi?) and is it technically possible to load our own code to them, but still funny, isn't it? :)

Now: long-awaited ElcomSoft Password Recovery KIT

Tuesday, October 6th, 2009

Click to see this fat and full of cholesterol image in details

Our it-friends from Ukraine (KARPOLAN and Dmitry) highly optimized our developing processes and helped us finalize long-awaited Password Recovery KIT. We won’t go deep into technical details, just have a look at rough visualization.

More on Radeon HD 5000

Thursday, September 10th, 2009

Tom’s Hardware is a really good source we can definitely trust, so if you need more details on Radeon HD 5000-series cards (specifications and prices) that are coming soon, just read:

Best Graphics Cards For The Money: September ’09

Update (Sep 16th): GT300 could outperform the Radeon HD5870

Update (Sep 22nd): ATI Radeon HD 5870 pricing and specs list revealed

Update (Sep 23rd): ATI Radeon HD 5870: DirectX 11, Eyefinity, And Serious Speed

AMD vs NVIDIA, next round

Wednesday, September 9th, 2009

Looking for new password cracking hardware (to take advantage of GPU acceleration)? Wait just a little bit more: new ATI and NVIDIA cards (with DirectX 11) will be available soon.

ATI is going to release Radeon HD 5000 cards (5850, 5870, 5870 X2) in October — well, hopefully. The top one (HD 5870X2: single-PCB, dual-GPU) will retail for $599.

As for NVIDIA’s new GT300, the specifications were revealed in April. In brief, it groups processing cores in sets of 32 (up from 24 in GT200) — up to 512 cores total for the high-end part. If the clocks remain the same as on GT200, that will double the overall performance. And there are other improvements as well: e.g. GT300 cores rely on MIMD-similar functions. Some fresh information about GT300 availability:

You may ask — what about Intel? Well, new Core i5 and i7 (codename Lynnfield) now available. Nothing revolutionary new, just Intel P55 Express Chipset support: integrating both a 16-lane PCI Express 2 graphics port and two-channel memory controller on a single chip (previous chipsets required separate northbridge and southbridge), as well as several minor improvements. More information and some benchmarks at Intel Lynnfield; Core i5 750 and Core i7 870 Evaluation and New Intel Core i5, i7 Processors Product Matrix.

And still [almost] noting about Intel Larrabee, mostly just rumors:

Finally, funny article: NVIDIA to Intel: Your Days Are Numbered :)
 

Fastest GPU(s)

Tuesday, August 11th, 2009

Just about two weeks ago, ATI has introduced the fastest GPU yet: FirePro V8750. 800 shader engines, 115.2 GB/s memory bandwidth, 2 GB frame buffer memory (GDDR5), two DisplayPort outputs, one DVI output. Thinking about purchasing it? The cost is as high as $1,800. More details at Tom’s Hardware.

Want to compare ATI with NVIDIA? Then read ATI Stream vs. NVIDIA CUDA – GPGPU computing battle royale. Or you can use our Wireless Security Auditor (which supports cards from both manufacturers) for your own tests.