Posts Tagged ‘GPU acceleration’

CUDA-enabled applications

Monday, May 18th, 2009

Tom’s Hardware has tested two mainstream NVIDIA cards (GeForce 9600 GT and GeForce 9800 GTX) on several CUDA-enabled applications. The applications were:

  • SETI@home
  • CyberLink PowerDirector
  • Tsunami MPEG Encoder
  • Super LoiLoScope
  • Badaboom

(more…)

Password-related news

Tuesday, May 12th, 2009

There is a few, so I’ll put ‘em all into a single blog post :)

First, Phoenix Technologies announced a program (for Windows XP/Vista) to link mobile phones with computer. But no, this is not about data transfer between the phone and PC. Indeed, this is a security system: walk away from your computer, and it will lock automatically; when the user returns, the program will automatically unlock the system. Of course, using Bluetooth (what else? :)). More details on Phoenix Freeze web site.

Second, Researchers take over botnet, grab 56,000 passwords an hour. Actually, this is not a very fresh idea (to steal the passwords using the malware). More important: the researchers found that most users reused passwords for multiple sites. I can guess that there are even some users who have the same passwords for accessing web sites (from pet lovers forum to online banking) and critical business data. So instead of breaking your PGP Disk container (which is really secury, even with our GPU acceleration), someone can just get the password saved by your browser. You’re warned.

And finally, just a funny story: Creative passwords only useful if you can remember them. Btw, how many cats do you have? ;)

What does “The only way to break into PGP” mean?

Thursday, April 30th, 2009

Note to PGP legal dept: I’m not going to put the ® sign every time when I mention PGP. I’m just tired; we already did that in our press release and on our web site, and I think it’s enough. No, really? Well, I’ll repeat one more time: all names like PGP are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners in the UK, USA, Russia and probably somewhere else  e.g. in Albania. There are too many countries to mention, sorry :). Why should I care about (R)? Keep reading, and you’ll see the reason.

Note to PGP executive and marketing depts: thanks again for helping our marketing people to spread a word about company and our software. We have received many calls from local and international media, a nice press coverage, and a lot of people coming to our booth at InfoSecurity. Well, and several good orders  mostly from forensic/investigation people.

Now an update to my previous post. It becomes more and more funny: PGP has wrote about our ‘conflict’ in their own blog. And the author is… Jon Callas, CTO of PGP. He called his blog entry Lies, Damned Lies, and Marketing – not bad, eh? But the contents is even better. Jon starts with the words about ElcomSoft: "The company who made this has a great product, and as I said then, it’s a very cool product." Thanks Jon, but we already knew that our software is "great" and "cool" – otherwise we would not get enough sales ;). But Jon’s story continues with the following:

[ElcomSoft] booth said, “the only way to break into PGP®.” This is a lie, and a lie in two directions.

1.They’re not breaking into PGP, they’re doing password cracking. There’s a difference.
2.They’re not the only people who do it. As I’ve said before there are plenty of other password crackers, both commercial and open source.
In short, the sign was factually incorrect, and lies about PGP.

If we lie, please sue us. If we don’t, better be quiet, please. But PGP marketing people have selected the 3rd way: complained to Reed Exhibitions and asked to destroy [a part of] our booth. Well done.

About [1]: from my personal point of view, "breaking into PGP" can mean "password cracking" as well. Do we provide the tool to get access to password-protected PGP disk? Obviously we do. Did we say that it works in 100% cases, or that we cracked PGP encryption/algorithms? No we did not. Oh well, our English is definitely not perfect, but I think it is still better than your Russian, Jon ;)

About [2]: yes, there is a lot of password crackers around. But I’m aware of just a single one (except ours, of course) for PGP Disk – and it is commercial; supports old versions of PGP Disk only; moreover, it is distributed only as a part of very expensive commerial e-discovery package – and it is MUCH slower than ours (because it does not use GPU acceleration). Sorry, I will not mention the vendor name here, simply because it is our competitor – and it did not pay us for an advertisement :). Jon, I’d appreciate if you can name the other ones (commercial or open-source). If you cannot, YOU lie. But I like your wording "as I’ve said before"; I think I should used it myself, too (e.g. "as I’ve said before, PGP is not secure and can be cracked" – without reference, for sure :)).

I recall how I talked to PGP representative a year ago – on previous InfoSecurity UK. The first question he asked was: "Have you received an e-mail from our legal department?". I replied "Should I?"; he said "Yes", and explained the reason: there was no (R) sign (near "PGP") in our press release (Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery Unlocks PGP Protection). Well, see the note at the beginning of this post ;)

Another note: in fact, we were strictly prohibited (by Reed, but that’s definitely not their own initiative, but for sure PGP’s one) from printing anything about PGP on our booth. It’s a pity that I did not have a voice recorder handy. So if we wrote something like The only way to break PGP passwords, or The most cost-effective way to crack PGP passwords etc, such panel will be removed as well. We’ll probably try this next year. But we reserved the other place for InfoSecurity 2010 – not so close to PGP; I think it is a good idea anyway, because every half an hour they’re doing very loud (but not very smart) presentations telling people that PGP is #1 in this and that (nothing really interesting/technical/innovative).

Oh, I forgot to mention that we received a document from Reed explaining why they’ve removed our wall paper, finally – at the end of the first day, i.e. about 8 hours after removal. The official Regulations (sorry, I’m too lazy to scan it – but I will, if you wish) say that it should be done in advance (and no action can be made without prior notice in writing), but who cares? Anyway, for those who interested – here is how it looks like:

But I should also mention that Reed keeps their word: our panel has been replaced this morning (at their own cost). Have a look (the second panel from the right; the color is slightly different from the original one, but still better than nothing):

 

Lessons learned? You guess yourself. I would not say anything bad about PGP and/or Reed – they really helped us a lot. And I would NOT recommend PGP to send smarter people to the exhibition next year – so we’ll be able to save a significant part of our marketing budget ;)

After all… All of the above (as well as my other posts) is my personal view, and not an official position of ElcomSoft. Yeah, I’m the CEO of ElcomSoft, and I’m the person who approved the design of our booth (btw, only two days before the show: we were really busy doing technical stuff), but anyway.

Oh, almost forgot to share one more picture – with ElcomSoft people:

From left to right:

  • Andrey Belenko, IT Security Analyst (and an inventor of GPU acceleration; well-known person in ‘crypto’ world)
  • Olga Koksharova, Marketing Director (doing real and smart marketing and PR, much better than PGP’s one)
  • Vladimir Katalov, CEO/co-owner (me; ex-programmer – not a stupid ‘manager’ hired by expensive headhunters)

And finally, thanks to all who made the comments to my previous post. As you can see, our blog is NOT MODERATED – in contrary to PGP’s one (which is actually premoderated, try it yourself; we made some comments there, but they have not appeared – at least in about two hours after writing). Censored? ;)

From InfoSecurity, “the number One in Europe”

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

We never thought that our participation would bring such kind of trouble (or at least a disappointment).

Monday early morning we came to prepare our stand and apply our wallpapers (yes, we do it ourselves, sort of team building :)). Practically, everything went smoothly, except for the fact that the organizers did not fix our company name board, electricity was not there and finally – we have got less space than we ordered (and paid for) because wall panels were not constructed properly. But after all, [almost] everything was fixed. Unfortunately, we have not made any pictures, but here is how it should look like (by design):

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Next morning (the first day of the exhibition) we came to our booth in advance (about half an hour before the exhibition opens). And what we have seen? Two persons (from Reed Exhibitions, the organizers of this event) removing one of the wall papers from our booth – the one that said that we’re doing PGP password recovery. Moreover, we were not able to get the clear answer why they’re doing that, except the fact that “PGP Corporation complained”. And the reference to some “regulations” we still have not seen. We asked for some official paper (act?) about our “violation”, and still waiting for it. When (if?) we’ll get it, we’ll scan it and publish here.

Fortunately, we had the camera handy, and so made several photos of this “process” (removing our wall paper). Organizers (Reed) did not like that, too, and tried to hide their faces from the camera. But they failed, so you can see them now (and the whole “process”):

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So we had to put the following note here (fortunately, on one panel only):

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Only two hours later, they (Reed Exhibitions Group Event Director) came to our booth and asked to remove this note. Oops, sorry: not asked, just removed. Without explanation. Well, the explanation was: we have the right to do anything here.

What are they (PGP) scared about? I don’t have an answer. Do we say that PGP protection/encryption is not secure? No we don’t. But we DO say that PGP passwords can be cracked – if they are not selected carefully. But if PGP people cannot explain that to their clients – this is not our fault.

Update: see What does "The only way to break into PGP" mean?

NVIDIA about Intel

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

Considering Intel Core i7? Read Nvidia Says Core i7 Isn’t Worth It and nVidia calls Core i7 a waste of money first. We’d agree that investing into GPU(s) is really a good idea, especially if you need to crack passwords.

Wardriving with NVIDIA

Tuesday, April 28th, 2009

17" screen, Intel Core 2 Extreme processor (four cores) plus NVIDIA GeForce GTX 260M — an excellent device not only for gaming, but also for wardriving. Get it from Sager, and just add Wireless Security Auditor.

Tesla supercomputer

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009

Can you imagine 10,080 processing cores? And how about 40 TFlops? Thanks to NVIDIA Tesla — this is 42 C1060 cards only.

And btw, don’t miss NVidia Promotion: 50% off MSRP on Tesla C1060.

Password cracking with Apple Mac Pro

Tuesday, April 21st, 2009

Nvidia has announced that it will now offer Nvidia Quadro FX 4800 for Apple Mac Pro systems. Good idea! More on CNET.

NVIDIA GT300

Monday, April 20th, 2009

According to The Inquirer, Nvidia GT300 promised in October. Should be a good video card for GPU-accelerated password cracking :).

Microsoft Office 14

Thursday, April 16th, 2009

According to CNET News, Office 14 technical preview will be available in Q3, and release version in the first half of 2010; Office 2010 will come in both 32-bit and 64-bit versions.

If password encryption will be improved there — of course, we’ll update Office Password Recovery accordingly. Though it is already good enough in Office 2007 — even with GPU acceleration, the password recovery speed is only thousands passwords per second (see some benchmarks at Distributed Password Recovery page), so even relatively short passwords are secure enough.